2nd Stronger Interview Strategies

by Vargas, Rosa Elizabeth Friday, April 20, 2012
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It happens. You might not have performed so well in the first interview but because you have a good “in” with someone at the company, to your surprise, you are on your way to your second interview. Yet, you know you must take that interview performance to the next level. Here are a few interview strategies to help you prepare to take a giant leap ahead of the rest in the interview vetting process.

Revisit weak areas from first interview. Open the second interview by creating an opportunity to discuss the areas where you think you fell short the first time around. Don’t be afraid to “go there.” However, be careful how you phrase your plea but something like so will work…


The last time we spoke, I did not leave the interview 100% confident that I had fully highlighted how perfect I am for this position. Allow me to revisit and reinfornce my qualifications in the following areas…



Mirror behavioral questions. Behavioral interviews can catch you by surprise.By mirroring these questions back to the interviewer, you can buy yourself time to think and you will feel more empowered during the interview. Re-position yourself in the “driver’s seat” and while you are reclaiming the steering wheel, facilitate communications, creating an easy-flowing interview.


So, you would like me to highlight my experience in global market development with a specific example while I was at XYZ compay.



Bring a second list of “selective” references to an interview. You might have already provided a list of references but you can provide another list! This list will include names with titles and contact information for select professionals who will support your qualifications in the areas that you fell short in the last time you were interviewed.

Bottom-line is the interview vetting process can be long. You are not out, until you are truly out! In the meantime, regroup, modify your marketing plan in reaction to the employer’s needs and where you think you stand.

One last thought: Don’t forget to leverage the thank you letter in this process.