91 to 100 of 104
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - August 7, 2009
    If you're an executive looking for a new role, you know the drill: ready your resume, examine your references, and build that network.However, the job search HAS changed. Now, there's one more item you'll need to focus on--your online identity.Employers turn to the Internet to dig up information prior to even considering an executive candidate, according to many recruiters. And, as you can imagine, what they find can either pr...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - August 7, 2009
    If you've heard the siren call of business ownership, only to find that the economy has affected your clients or business, you might be facing an executive job search that comes with an extra hurdle--that of transitioning your executive resume from an entrepreneurial mindset.What's the best way to show employers that you're serious about this move--and that you truly deserve that top executive spot?Like any complex change, you...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - August 7, 2009
    In the rush to get your resume in front of employers, stop for a minute (or a few hours) and consider whether you're giving an accurate picture of your capabilities.All too often, candidates unload a mixed bag of skills, job duties, and meaningless phrases (take "self-motivated team player" - please) on employers, and then wonder why they're still job hunting months later.It's important to map out a resume strategy BEFORE writ...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - August 7, 2009
    One of the big mysteries that confounds job hunters is that they see a great job posting, apply to it, and then... nothing. Why isn't the phone ringing? It's often that automated systems are "reading" your executive resume--and they don't like what they see.Under siege, employers are trying to filter out unqualified applicants for executive roles as hard as they're trying to get IN. If you're not receiving a response from your...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - August 7, 2009
    One of the most puzzling concepts to some candidates is that of the resume as a marketing document INSTEAD of a job application.This may come as a surprise, but employers don't want to read through all of your work history! The past decade is of most interest to them, as well as any and all relevant qualifications that prepare you to be their best candidate.To get at the heart of this idea, start thinking of the story of your...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - May 20, 2009
    If you’re in the midst of a job hunt, you’ve likely added information to your resume that shows your job responsibilities and the scope of your authority throughout your career. But does your resume actually tell a story—or ALL of your success stories?You may have already realized that, in order to give a focused picture of your skills, you’ll need to add metrics to your resume. However, the most powerful and meaningful resume...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - March 13, 2009
    There’s no doubt about it: LinkedIn is one of the greatest job search tools available today. Not only can you “advertise” your availability and display career endorsements, but being viewable on LI is a boon to recruiters that may need your skills.However, building an effective online profile is something few people address in detail. You may spend hours preparing your resume, only to be confused about which components to use...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - February 17, 2009
    If you’re a professional searching for your next opportunity in today’s aggressive job market, you’ve probably found that the task of marketing yourself is unlike any other. How do you sum up a long, storied career in just a few paragraphs? What is the best way to differentiate yourself on paper — and to get others to focus on this value?Standing out among the pack requires an intense emphasis on your natural leadership abilit...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - February 9, 2009
    When it comes to your job search, are you out in front of the right audience - or do they know next to nothing about you? If there's one mistake that executive job hunters make over and over again, it's being a best-kept secret: at their jobs, on their resumes, and during their searches. They are reluctant to toot their own horn, so to speak, thinking that it will be seen in a negative light. Well, it does cost them, bu...
  • by Laura Smith-Proulx - September 11, 2008
    You’ve probably heard that employers expect to see an exact match to their skills on your resume, and that you should be tailoring your resume to each job. But, you might think—if I do that, I'll be writing forever!Of course, there’s a point to customizing your resume to meet the needs of employers. A resume in today’s competitive market must deliver a clear message in order to be effective. However, this doesn't mean that eve...